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Master These 14 Typical Interview Questions Comments

  • By Emily Co, POPSUGAR Smart Living
  • January 27, 2014

Where Do You See Yourself in a Few Years?
Think about how you can move forward from the position you're eyeing. Figure out the natural career track and tailor your answer to the company. Try to be honest but not to the point where you make yourself look like an unattractive candidate, such as saying you want to work for their competitor or something too personal like becoming a mom. Stick to professional examples; they don't want to hear about your personal life plan.

Are You Interviewing With Other Companies?
Try not to spend too much time on this question and answer briefly. A simple yes and mentioning the fact that you're open to opportunities will do the trick. You can also say that this particular job is your first choice. Remember, honesty is always the best policy, and don't lie and say you're interviewing at certain companies when you're not.

What Can You Do For This Company?
There are several versions of this question, which also includes, "What will you do when you're at [job position x]?" When you're preparing for the interview, think about why you would do a good job at the position and what steps you would take to achieve that.

Bring in new ideas and examples of what you have done in the past that has benefited your previous companies. One trick that will help the company visualize you in the position is to tell them exactly what you'd do in the first two weeks at the job. Be specific about what you'd like to accomplish, so it's more believable and impressive.

Why Do You Want to Leave or Why Did You Leave Your Current Job?
It's understandable if you were laid off given the rocky economy. You don't have to share the dirty details, but you should be truthful and mention that your company had to let go of X number of people or the department was being restructured.

If you are leaving because of a negative situation, be sure not to badmouth your old company or boss. It just reflects badly on you if you do. You can focus on the fact that you're looking for growth and that you feel this company feels like the step in the right direction.

When Did You Have to Deal With Conflict in the Office, and How Did You Resolve It?
Be careful when you're addressing this question and make sure that you're not bitter or negative in your answer. You should always be positive because this reflects the fact that you take conflict well. Talk about a problem you faced (preferably not something you created), and detail the steps you proactively took to resolve the problem. The best examples will come from your past experiences.

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