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My Company Countered My New Job Offer — What Should I Do?

  • By Christine Tardio
  • August 03, 2015

job offers

I've been feeling invisible in my current company and position. It's not bad, per se, but not good either. So I went and got a new job, which was great news. Until I told my supervisor and he came back with a counter-offer that includes a promotion (more money and a title change).

Now I'm confused about what to do. The new position was going to be a lateral move with my current job title and slightly more money. Should I stay or should I go?

If you have already accepted the new position, you have given your word. Your word should mean something, and it — and your reputation — will follow you throughout your career. You should take the new position. That being said, if you are still in the negotiating stage, you have a choice to make.

It’s rarely a good sign when a company makes an employee feel invisible and only acknowledges that person when she threatens to leave. Great employers should continually motivate and inspire their employees, look for growth opportunities for their people, and provide ongoing feedback.

If you stay with your current employer, what are the chances that within a short time you’ll once again feel invisible? To help you make your choice, ask your managers why they have now decided to try to keep you at the company — and ask them to map out what they see as your next two years there. This way, you'll get a sense of how committed they are to you and to your future advancement within the organization.

As you consider the offer at the new company, try to imagine your situation a year from now should you accept the position. Is it the kind of company that encourages and supports its talent? Do the managers recognize accomplishments, present opportunities for advancement, and provide monetary rewards? Do your due diligence and weigh those assessments against what your current employer tells you about their plans for you.

Your decision should not simply be focused on just the short-term issue of money and title — it should be about where you have the greatest opportunities for long-term success. Take the option where you’ll be treated like a valued employee, receive feedback and guidance, see career advancement opportunities, help to build something that matters, and find professional and personal satisfaction.

Christine Tardio is a trusted advisor and business coach to a dynamic range of women business leaders. She can be reached at thelookinglass.com.

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